Functional

Opa

Opa is a new member in the family of languages aiming to make web programming transparent by automatically generating client-side Javascript and handling communication and session control. Opa is written in OCaml. A hierarchical database and web server are integrated with the language. The distribution model is based on a notion of a session, a construct roughly comparable to process definitions in the join-calculus or to concurrent objects in a number of formalisms.

A good place to start is here. And here you can find several example programs with accompanying source code.

Lightweight Monadic Programming in ML

Lightweight Monadic Programming in ML

Many useful programming constructions can be expressed as monads. Examples include probabilistic modeling, functional reactive programming, parsing, and information flow tracking, not to mention effectful functionality like state and I/O. In this paper, we present a type-based rewriting algorithm to make programming with arbitrary monads as easy as using ML's built-in support for state and I/O. Developers write programs using monadic values of type M t as if they were of type t, and our algorithm inserts the necessary binds, units, and monad-to-monad morphisms so that the program type checks. Our algorithm, based on Jones' qualified types, produces principal types. But principal types are sometimes problematic: the program's semantics could depend on the choice of instantiation when more than one instantiation is valid. In such situations we are able to simplify the types to remove any ambiguity but without adversely affecting typability; thus we can accept strictly more programs. Moreover, we have proved that this simplification is efficient (linear in the number of constraints) and coherent: while our algorithm induces a particular rewriting, all related rewritings will have the same semantics. We have implemented our approach for a core functional language and applied it successfully to simple examples from the domains listed above, which are used as illustrations throughout the paper.

This is an intriguing paper, with an implementation in about 2,000 lines of OCaml. I'm especially interested in its application to probabilistic computing, yielding a result related to Kiselyov and Shan's Hansei effort, but without requiring delimited continuations (not that there's anything wrong with delimited continuations). On a theoretical level, it's nice to see such a compelling example of what can be done once types are freed from the shackle of "describing how bits are laid out in memory" (another such compelling example, IMHO, is type-directed partial evaluation, but that's literally another story).

Levy: a Toy Call-by-Push-Value Language

Andrej Bauer's blog contains the PL Zoo project. In particular, the Levy language, a toy implementation of Paul Levy's CBPV in OCaml.

If you're curious about CBPV, this implementation might be a nice accompaniment to the book, or simply a hands on way to check it out.

It looks like an implementation of CBPV without sum and product types, with complex values, and without effects. I guess a more hands-on way to get to grips with CBPV would be to implement any of these missing features.

The posts are are 3 years old, but I've only just noticed them. The PL Zoo project was briefly mentioned here.

Kleisli Arrows of Outrageous Fortune

Kleisli Arrows of Outrageous Fortune

When we program to interact with a turbulent world, we are to some extent at its mercy. To achieve safety, we must ensure that programs act in accordance with what is known about the state of the world, as determined dynamically. Is there any hope to enforce safety policies for dynamic interaction by static typing? This paper answers with a cautious ‘yes’.

Monads provide a type discipline for effectful programming, mapping value types to computation types. If we index our types by data approximating the ‘state of the world’, we refine our values to witnesses for some condition of the world. Ordinary monads for indexed types give a discipline for effectful programming contingent on state, modelling the whims of fortune in way that Atkey’s indexed monads for ordinary types do not (Atkey, 2009). Arrows in the corresponding Kleisli category represent computations which a reach a given postcondition from a given precondition: their types are just specifications in a Hoare logic!

By way of an elementary introduction to this approach, I present the example of a monad for interacting with a file handle which is either ‘open’ or ‘closed’, constructed from a command interface specfied Hoare-style. An attempt to open a file results in a state which is statically unpredictable but dynamically detectable. Well typed programs behave accordingly in either case. Haskell’s dependent type system, as exposed by the Strathclyde Haskell Enhancement preprocessor, provides a suitable basis for this simple experiment.

I discovered this Googling around in an attempt to find some decent introductory material to Kleisli arrows. This isn't introductory, but it's a good resource. :-) The good introductory material I found was this.

Patterns in Functional Programming

The good news is that Jeremy Gibbons is writing a book on Patterns in Functional Programming. Even better news is that he is blogging about it as he goes along!

Those unfamiliar with the topic may want to begin at the beginning, though I personally just rummaged around. Some may enjoy going to the papers rather than the blog, or even better to the LtU discussions about many of them. Alternatively, I think it might be a great opportunity to ask Jeremy questions using the comments on his blog. I am sure this can be a very productive learning experience, and will surely help the book!

Interview With Albert Gräf - Author of the Pure Programming Language

Albert Gräf is the author of the Pure programming language. Pure is a functional programming language based on term rewriting. It has a syntax featuring curried function applications, lexical closures and equational definitions with pattern matching, and thus is somewhat similar to languages of the Haskell and ML variety. Pure is also a dynamic language, and is more like Lisp in this respect. The interpreter has an LLVM backend that does JIT compilation.

Part 1 and Part 2

The Habit Programming Language: The Revised Preliminary Report

Habit is a systems programming dialect of Haskell from the High-Assurance Systems Programming (HASP) project at Portland State University. From The Habit Programming Language: The Revised Preliminary Report

This report presents a preliminary design for the programming language Habit, a dialect of Haskell that supports the development of high quality systems software. The primary commitments of the design are as follows:

* Systems programming: Unlike Haskell, which was intended to serve as a general purpose functional programming language, the design of Habit focusses on features that are needed in systems software development. These priorities are reflected fairly directly in the new features that Habit provides for describing bit-level and memory-based data representations, the introduction of new syntactic extensions to facilitate monadic programming, and, most significantly, the adoption of a call-by-value semantics to improve predictability of execution. The emphasis on systems programming also impacts the design in less direct ways, including assumptions about the expected use of whole program compilation and optimization strategies in a practical Habit implementation.

* High assurance: Although most details of Haskell’s semantics have been formalized at some point in the research literature, there is no consolidated formal description of the whole language. There are also known differences in semantics, particularly with respect to operational behavior, between different Haskell implementations in areas where the Haskell report provides no guidance. Although it is not addressed in the current report, a high-priority for Habit is to provide a full, formal semantics for the complete language that can be used as a foundation for reasoning and formal verification, a mechanism for ensuring consistency between implementations, and a basis for reliably predicting details about memory allocation, asymptotic behavior, and resource utilization.

HASP has a couple of postdoc positions open to help with Habit.

Scripting with Types

A nice presentation on Practical Haskell Programming: Scripting with Types from Don Stewart.

Invertible Syntax Descriptions: Unifying Parsing and Pretty Printing

In Invertible Syntax Descriptions: Unifying Parsing and Pretty Printing, Rendel Tillmann and Klaus Ostermann at the University of Marburg, Germany apply the "don't repeat yourself" principle to parsers and pretty printers.

Parsers and pretty-printers for a language are often quite similar, yet both are typically implemented separately, leading to redundancy and potential inconsistency. We propose a new interface of syntactic descriptions, with which both parser and pretty-printer can be described as a single program. Whether a syntactic description is used as a parser or as a pretty-printer is determined by the implementation of the interface. Syntactic descriptions enable programmers to describe the connection between concrete and abstract syntax once and for all, and use these descriptions for parsing or pretty-printing as needed. We also discuss the generalization of our programming technique towards an algebra of partial isomorphisms.

Concurrent Pattern Calculus

Concurrent Pattern Calculus by Thomas Given-Wilson, Daniele Gorla, and Barry Jay:

Concurrent pattern calculus drives interaction between processes by comparing data structures, just as sequential pattern calculus drives computation. By generalising from pattern matching to pattern unification , interaction becomes symmetrical, with information flowing in both directions. This provides a natural language for describing any form of exchange or trade. Many popular process calculi can be encoded in concurrent pattern calculi.

Barry Jay's Pattern Calculus has been discussed a few times here before. I've always been impressed with the pattern calculus' expressive power for computing over arbitrary structure. The pattern calculus supports new forms of polymorphism, which he termed "path polymorphism" and "pattern polymorphism", which are difficult to provide in other calculi. The closest I can think of would be a compiler-provided generalized fold over any user-defined structure.

This work extends the pattern calculus to the concurrent setting by adding constructs for parallel composition, name restriction and replication, and argues convincingly for its greater expressiveness as compared to other concurrent calculi. He addresses some of the obvious concerns for symmetric information flow of the unification operation.

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