Xavier Leroy will receive the Royal Society's 2016 Milner Award

The Royal Society will award Xavier Leroy the Milner Award 2016

... in recognition of his research on the OCaml functional programming language and on the formal verification of compilers.

Xavier's replied:

It is very moving to see how far we have come, from Milner's great ideas of the 1970s to tools as powerful and as widely used as OCaml and Coq.

Don Syme receives a medal for F#

Don Syme receives the Royal Academy of Engineering's Silver Medal for his work on F#. The citation reads:

F# is known for being a clear and more concise language that interoperates well with other systems, and is used in applications as diverse asanalysing the UK energy market to tackling money laundering. It allows programmers to write code with fewer bugs than other languages, so users can get their programme delivered to market both rapidly and accurately. Used by major enterprises in the UK and worldwide, F# is both cross-platform and open source, and includes innovative features such as unit-of-measure inference, asynchronous programming and type providers, which have in turn influenced later editions of C# and other industry languages.


Apple Introduces Swift

Apple today announced a new programming language for their next version of Mac OS X and iOS called Swift.

The Language Guide has more details about the potpourri of language features.

Multiple Dispatch as Dispatch on Tuples

Multiple Dispatch as Dispatch on Tuples, by Gary T. Leavens and Todd D. Millstein:

Many popular object-oriented programming languages, such as C++, Smalltalk-80, Java, and Eiffel, do not support multiple dispatch. Yet without multiple dispatch, programmers find it difficult to express binary methods and design patterns such as the "visitor" pattern. We describe a new, simple, and orthogonal way to add multimethods to single-dispatch object-oriented languages, without affecting existing code. The new mechanism also clarifies many differences between single and multiple dispatch.

Multimethods and multiple dispatch has been discussed numerous times here on LtU. While the theory has been fully fleshed out to the point of supporting full-fledged type systems for multiple dispatch, there has always remained a conceptual disconnect between multimethods and the OO model, namely that methods are supposed to be messages sends to objects with privileged access to that object's internal state. Multimethods would seem to violate encapsulation inherent to objects, and don't fit with the conceptual messaging model.

This paper goes some way to solving that disconnect, as multiple dispatch is simply single dispatch on a distinct, primitive class type which is predicated on N other class types and thus supporting N-ary dispatch. This multiple dispatch support can also be retrofitted to an existing single-dispatch languages without violating its existing dispatch model.

Pure Subtype Systems

Pure Subtype Systems, by DeLesley S. Hutchins:

This paper introduces a new approach to type theory called pure subtype systems. Pure subtype systems differ from traditional approaches to type theory (such as pure type systems) because the theory is based on subtyping, rather than typing. Proper types and typing are completely absent from the theory; the subtype relation is defined directly over objects. The traditional typing relation is shown to be a special case of subtyping, so the loss of types comes without any loss of generality.

Pure subtype systems provide a uniform framework which seamlessly integrates subtyping with dependent and singleton types. The framework was designed as a theoretical foundation for several problems of practical interest, including mixin modules, virtual classes, and feature-oriented programming.

The cost of using pure subtype systems is the complexity of the meta-theory. We formulate the subtype relation as an abstract reduction system, and show that the theory is sound if the underlying reductions commute. We are able to show that the reductions commute locally, but have thus far been unable to show that they commute globally. Although the proof is incomplete, it is “close enough” to rule out obvious counter-examples. We present it as an open problem in type theory.

A thought-provoking take on type theory using subtyping as the foundation for all relations. He collapses the type hierarchy and unifies types and terms via the subtyping relation. This also has the side-effect of combining type checking and partial evaluation. Functions can accept "types" and can also return "types".

Of course, it's not all sunshine and roses. As the abstract explains, the metatheory is quite complicated and soundness is still an open question. Not too surprising considering type checking Type:Type is undecidable.

Hutchins' thesis is also available for a more thorough treatment. This work is all in pursuit of Hitchens' goal of feature-oriented programming.

Concurrent Revisions

Concurrent Revisions is a Microsoft Research project doing interesting work in making concurrent programming scalable and easier to reason about. These papers work have been mentioned a number of times here on LtU, but none of them seem to have been officially posted as stories.

Concurrent Revisions are a distributed version control-like abstraction [1] for concurrently mutable state that requires clients to specify merge functions that make fork-join deterministic, and so make concurrent programs inherently composable. The library provide default merge behaviour for various familiar objects like numbers and lists, and it seems somewhat straightforward to provide a merge function for many other object types.

They've also extended the work to seamlessly integrate incremental and parallel computation [2] in a fairly intuitive fashion, in my opinion.

Their latest work [3] extends these concurrent revisions to distributed scenarios with disconnected operations, which operate much like distributed version control works with source code, with guarantees of eventual consistency.

All in all, a very promising approach, and deserving of wider coverage.

[1] Sebastian Burckhardt and Daan Leijen, Semantics of Concurrent Revisions, in European Symposium on Programming (ESOP'11), Springer Verlag, Saarbrucken, Germany, March 2011
[2] Sebastian Burckhardt, Daan Leijen, Caitlin Sadowski, Jaeheon Yi, and Thomas Ball, Two for the Price of One: A Model for Parallel and Incremental Computation, in Proceedings of the ACM International Conference on Object Oriented Programming Systems Languages and Applications (OOPSLA'11), ACM SIGPLAN, Portland, Oregon, 22 October 2011
[3] Sebastian Burckhardt, Manuel Fahndrich, Daan Leijen, and Benjamin P. Wood, Cloud Types for Eventual Consistency, in Proceedings of the 26th European Conference on Object-Oriented Programming (ECOOP), Springer, 15 June 2012

Feature-Oriented Programming with Object Algebras

Feature-Oriented Programming with Object Algebras, by Bruno C.d.S. Oliveira, Tijs van der Storm, Alex Loh, William R. Cook:

Object algebras are a new programming technique that enables a simple solution to basic extensibility and modularity issues in programming languages. While object algebras excel at defining modular features, the composition mechanisms for object algebras (and features) are still cumbersome and limited in expressiveness. In this paper we leverage two well-studied type system features, intersection types and type-constructor polymorphism, to provide object algebras with expressive and practical composition mechanisms. Intersection types are used for defining expressive run-time composition operators (combinators) that produce objects with multiple (feature) interfaces. Type-constructor polymorphism enables generic interfaces for the various object algebra combinators. Such generic interfaces can be used as a type-safe front end for a generic implementation of the combinators based on reflection. Additionally, we also provide a modular mechanism to allow different forms of self-references in the presence of delegation-based combinators. The result is an expressive, type-safe, dynamic, delegation-based composition technique for object algebras, implemented in Scala, which effectively enables a form of Feature-Oriented Programming using object algebras.

A follow-up to Object Algebras, this new paper addresses a few of the limitations described in that LtU thread by adding type constructor polymorphism to increase their safety. The paper describes an implementation in Scala, which is the only widely available statically typed OOP language with a sufficiently powerful type system needed to support FOP.

This new work also describes some composition mechanisms for object algebras in the context of more expressive languages.

Object Algebras

The ECOOP 2012 best paper award this year was given to Bruno Oliveira and William Cook for the paper "Extensibility for the Masses: Practical Extensibility with Object Algebras".

This paper is (yet another) solution to the expression problem. The basic idea is that you create a family of objects via an Abstract Factory. You can add new objects to the family by extending the factory as per usual, but the twist is you can also add new operations by overriding the factory methods to do other things, like evaluation or pretty printing.

Bruno has also been collecting sample implementations using Object Algebras solving a simple expression problem example.

What does focusing tell us about language design?

A blog post about Call-By-Push-Value by Rob Simmons: What does focusing tell us about language design?

I think that one of the key observations of focusing/CBPV is that programs are dealing with two different things - data and computation - and that we tend to get the most tripped up when we confuse the two.

  • Data is classified by data types (a.k.a. positive types). Data is defined by how it is constructed, and the way you use data is by pattern-matching against it.
  • Computation is classified by computation types (a.k.a. negative types). Computations are defined their eliminations - that is, by how they respond to signals/messages/pokes/arguments.

There are two things I want to talk about, and they're both recursive types: call-by-push-value has positive recursive types (which have the feel of inductive types and/or algebras and/or what we're used to as datatypes in functional languages) and negative recursive types (which have the feel of recursive, lazy records and/or "codata" whatever that is and/or coalgebras and/or what William Cook calls objects). Both positive and negative recursive types are treated by Paul Blain Levy in his thesis (section 5.3.2) and in the Call-By-Push Value book (section 4.2.2).

In particular, I want to claim that Call-By-Push-Value and focusing suggest two fundamental features that should be, and generally aren't (at least simultaneously) in modern programming languages:

  • Support for structured data with rich case analysis facilities (up to and beyond what are called views)
  • Support for recursive records and negative recursive types.

Previously on Rob's blog: Embracing and extending the Levy language; on LtU: Call by push-value, Levy: a Toy Call-by-Push-Value Language.

And let me also repeat CBPV's slogan, which is one of the finest in PL advocacy: Once the fine structure has been exposed, why ignore it?

Informed dissent: William Cook contra Bob Harper on OOP

Ongoing discussion that you can follow on William Cook's blog.

I am not going to take sides (or keep points). I know everyone here has an opinion on the issue, and many of the arguments were discussed here over the years. I still think LtU-ers will want to follow this.

Given the nature of the topic, I remind everyone to review our policies before posting here on the issue.

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