Fun

Interactive Tutorial of the Sequent Calculus

Interactive Tutorial of the Sequent Calculus by Edward Z. Yang.

This interactive tutorial will teach you how to use the sequent calculus, a simple set of rules with which you can use to show the truth of statements in first order logic. It is geared towards anyone with some background in writing software for computers, with knowledge of basic boolean logic. ...

Proving theorems is not for the mathematicians anymore: with theorem provers, it's now a job for the hacker. — Martin Rinard ...

A common complaint with a formal systems like the sequent calculus is the "I clicked around and managed to prove this, but I'm not really sure what happened!" This is what Martin means by the hacker mentality: it is now possible for people to prove things, even when they don't know what they're doing. The computer will ensure that, in the end, they will have gotten it right.

The tool behind this nice tutorial is Logitext.

Language mystery: identify the source language to a worm based on its object code

Here's a fun challenge for LtU. The team at Securelist is analyzing a worm called Duqu and found a few interesting things. One of them is that they can't figure out the source language for the core framework.

After having performed countless hours of analysis, we are 100% confident that the Duqu Framework was not programmed with Visual C++. It is possible that its authors used an in-house framework to generate intermediary C code, or they used another completely different programming language.

We would like to make an appeal to the programming community and ask anyone who recognizes the framework, toolkit or the programming language that can generate similar code constructions, to contact us or drop us a comment in this blogpost. We are confident that with your help we can solve this deep mystery in the Duqu story.

I'm not clear on how much knowing the source language helps with the security analysis, but what else were you doing with your time? All the details and clues in the object file can be found on their blog.

A Semantic Model for Graphical User Interfaces

Nick Benton and Neel Krishnaswami, ICFP'11, A Semantic Model for Graphical User Interfaces:

We give a denotational model for graphical user interface (GUI) programming using the Cartesian closed category of ultrametric spaces. [..] We capture the arbitrariness of user input [..] [by a nondeterminism] “powerspace” monad.

Algebras for the powerspace monad yield a model of intuitionistic linear logic, which we exploit in the definition of a mixed linear/non-linear domain-specific language for writing GUI programs. The non-linear part of the language is used for writing reactive stream-processing functions whilst the linear sublanguage naturally captures the generativity and usage constraints on the various linear objects in GUIs, such as the elements of a DOM or scene graph.

We have implemented this DSL as an extension to OCaml, and give examples demonstrating that programs in this style can be short and readable.

This is an application of their (more squiggly) LICS'11 submission, Ultrametric Semantics of Reactive Programs. In both these cases, I find appealing the fact the semantic model led to a type system and a language that was tricky to find.

Programming and Scaling

Programming and Scaling, a one-hour lecture by Alan Kay at his finest (and that's saying something!)

Some of my favorite quotes:

  • "The biggest problem we have as human beings is that we confuse our beliefs with reality."
  • "We could imagine taking the internet as a model for doing software modules. Why don't people do it?" (~00:17)
  • "One of the mistakes that we made years ago is that we made objects too small." (~00:26)
  • "Knowledge in many cases trumps IQ. [Henry] Ford was powerful because Isaac Newton changed the way we think." (~00:28)
  • "Knowledge is silver. Outlook is gold. IQ is a lead weight." (~00:30)
  • "Whatever we [in computing] do is more like what the Egyptians did. Building pyramids, piling things on top of each other."
  • "The ability to make science and engineering harmonize with each other - there's no greater music." (~00:47)

And there are some other nice ideas in there: "Model-T-Shirt Programming" - software the definition of which fits on a T-shirt. And imagining source code sizes in terms of books: 20,000 LOC = a 400-page book. A million LOC = a stack of books one meter high. (Windows Vista: a 140m stack of books.)

Note: this a Flash video, other formats are available.

Levy: a Toy Call-by-Push-Value Language

Andrej Bauer's blog contains the PL Zoo project. In particular, the Levy language, a toy implementation of Paul Levy's CBPV in OCaml.

If you're curious about CBPV, this implementation might be a nice accompaniment to the book, or simply a hands on way to check it out.

It looks like an implementation of CBPV without sum and product types, with complex values, and without effects. I guess a more hands-on way to get to grips with CBPV would be to implement any of these missing features.

The posts are are 3 years old, but I've only just noticed them. The PL Zoo project was briefly mentioned here.

Kona

Kona is a new open-source implementation of Arthur Whitney's K, an ASCII-based APL like language. Kona is a fully working version of K3.

If you haven't ever tried APL/J/K or ilk you might find this language incomprehensible at first -- unless you like a challenge! Watch the screencasts or read some of our earlier APL/J stories.

Regardless of your interest in K, any LtUer worth his salt will enjoy the source code. We wrote a bit about the history of the remarkable C coding style used in the past, but I can't locate the link at the moment.

Rule 110 in HTML5 + CSS3

This is sort of silly, but just plain cool. Eli Fox-Epstein encoded Rule 110 in HTML5 and CSS3. Rule 110 is Turing complete.

See one of his example tests on Github.

Tractatus Digito-Philosophicus

Tractatus Digito-Philosophicus, part of the project Wittgenstein for programmers by Harrison Ainsworth (whose blog is very much recommended to LtUers).

This is a somewhat odd venture: a translation of Wittgenstein's Tractatus into the domain of software development.

The software intellect – its basic conceptual forms – is rooted in the early 20th century, the 1910s, 1920s, 1930s. That is where the work of Church and Turing, lambda calculus and computability, comes from. And it is also the time of the Vienna Circle, logical positivism, and Wittgenstein's early work, the ‘Tractatus Logico-Philosophicus’.

One might notice one day that software seems pointedly related to its original philosophical contemporaries. It is fundamentally a logical construction. It is like a Wittgensteinian logical proposition, but instead of describing the world, software constructs the imagination. There is a clear isomorphism. All terms related to describing map to terms related to constructing, and similarly for world and imagination. It seems a simple transformation will take Wittgenstein to software.

So an interesting project emerges: translate the Tractatus into software terms! The result is sometimes obscure, but sometimes clearer than the original, and most is (still) quite odd and intriguing (which is perhaps the main virtue anyway) . . .

(So far it is only partial and unfinished.)

Scripting with Types

A nice presentation on Practical Haskell Programming: Scripting with Types from Don Stewart.

The Semicolon Wars

Some light reading for the holiday season: writing for American Scientest, Brian Hayes says in The Semicolon Wars

A catalog maintained by Bill Kinnersley of the University of Kansas lists about 2,500 programming languages. Another survey, compiled by Diarmuid Piggott, puts the total even higher, at more than 8,500. And keep in mind that whereas human languages have had millennia to evolve and diversify, all the computer languages have sprung up in just 50 years. Even by the more-conservative standards of the Kinnersley count, that means we've been inventing one language a week, on average, ever since Fortran.

For ethnologists, linguistic diversity is a cultural resource to be nurtured and preserved, much like biodiversity. All human languages are valuable; the more the better. That attitude of detached reverence is harder to sustain when it comes to computer languages, which are products of design or engineering rather than evolution. The creators of a new programming language are not just adding variety for its own sake; they are trying to make something demonstrably better. But the very fact that the proliferation of languages goes on and on argues that we still haven't gotten it right. We still don't know the best notation—or even a good-enough notation—for expressing an algorithm or defining a data structure.

XML feed